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Ignition interlock and drunk driving statistics

Statistics have shown the implementation of ignition interlock devices can save lives and reduce recidivism. Learn the consequences of drinking and driving, the benefits of ignition interlocks and home alcohol monitoring devices and how drinking and driving is affecting our youth.

Alcohol impairment & drunk driving

Deaths from drunk driving

9,967 people were killed in drunk driving crashes in 2014.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2015

10,076 people were killed in drunk driving crashes in 2013 - 1 every 53 minutes.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2014

Every day in America, another 28 people die as a result of drunk driving crashes.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2014

Drunk driving costs each adult in the United States almost $800 per year.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2014

Drunk driving costs the United States $199 billion a year.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2014

In 2012, 15% of all drivers involved in fatal crashes during the week were alcohol-impaired, compared to 30% on weekends.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2013

In fatal crashes in 2011, the highest percentage of drunk drivers was for drivers ages 21 to 24 (32%), followed by ages 25 to 34 (30%) and 35 to 44 (24%).
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2012

Each day, people drive drunk almost 300,000 times, but fewer than 4,000 are arrested.
Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2012

Impairment is not determined by the type of drink, but rather by the amount of alcohol drunk over time.
Source: National Highway Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, 2012

Adults drank too much and got behind the wheel about 112 million times in 2010—that is almost 300,000 incidents of drinking and driving each day.
Source: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 2011

drunk driver arrested

Almost half of drivers killed in crashes who tested positive for drugs also had alcohol in their system.
Source: Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E., 2011

In 2010, an estimated 4 million U.S. adult respondents reported at least one episode of alcohol-impaired driving, for an estimated total of approximately 112 million alcohol-impaired driving episodes or 479 episodes per 1,000 adult population. From a peak in 2006, such episodes decreased 30% through 2010. Men accounted for 81% of all episodes with young men aged 21-34 years accounting for 32% of all episodes. Additionally, 85% of alcohol-impaired driving episodes were reported by persons who also reported binge drinking, and the 4.5% of the adult population who reported binge drinking at least four times per month accounted for 55% of all alcohol-impaired driving episodes.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

Every 90 seconds a person is injured in a drunk driving crash.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fars data, 2011

In 2011 1.2 million drivers were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics.
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2011

It can cost another’s life. Alcohol-related traffic crashes don’t only affect the impaired driver. One third of alcohol-involved traffic fatalities are passengers, occupants in other vehicles or pedestrians.
Source: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 2011

An average drunk driver has driven drunk 80 times before first arrest.
Source: Centers for Disease Control, 2011

Every 90 seconds a person is injured in a drunk driving crash.

Drivers with a BAC level of .08 or higher in fatal crashes in 2012 were seven times more likely to have a prior conviction for driving while impaired than were drivers with no alcohol.
Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2011

Males were more likely than females (15.1% vs. 7.9%) to drive drunk.
Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2011

132 billion dollars is spent annually on alcohol-impaired motor vehicle crashes.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fars data, 2010

Between 60% and 80% of drivers with suspended licenses continue to drive.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2010

Law enforcement made 1.4 million arrests for driving under the influence in 2010. 20% are repeat offenders.
Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2010

23 million Americans are currently addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs. Alcohol abuse accounts for the majority 18.7 million people.
Source: Closing the Addiction Treatment Gap (CATG), 2009

Dollars spent annually on alcohol crashes.

If all 17 million people who admitted to driving drunk had their own state, it would be the fifth largest in the U.S.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2009

Due to increased public awareness, prevention, enforcement and treatment and recovery, alcohol-impaired driving deaths have decreased 48.5% from 1982 (26,172) to 2006 (13,470).
Source: National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc., 2006

The average person metabolizes alcohol at the rate of about one drink per hour.
Source: Michigan State University, Basic Alcohol Information, 2003

Drunk driving costs each adult in this country almost $500 per year.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2002

A standard drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits, which contain the same amount of alcohol.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2002

On average, one in three people will be involved in a drunk driving crash in their lifetime.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2001

14% of intoxicated drivers in fatal crashes have a current suspended or revoked license.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

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Cost of imprisonment is about 6 times higher than electronic monitoring

Home and fleet alcohol monitoring

Electronic monitoring Home alcohol monitoring reduces offenders’ risk of failure by 31 percent.
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2011

Electronic monitoring [Home alcohol monitoring] may increase over time as states seek less expensive alternatives to imprisonment. The cost of imprisonment is about 6 times higher than the cost of electronic monitoring.
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2011

39% of work-related traffic crashes are caused by alcohol.
Source: Occupational Safety & Health Administration

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Ignition interlocks

“A wealth of research continues to show that drivers compelled to install ignition interlock device or IIDs in their vehicles tend to have far fewer alcohol-related crashes, than drivers who have had their license suspended after being convicted of a DUI offense. Not only that, as a study in contrasts, IIDs are more effective than other methods at reducing re-arrest among convicted drunk drivers and keeping them off the road.”
Source: John B. Townsend II, AAA Mid-Atlantic’s Manager of Public and Government Affairs, 2014

All 50 states have some sort of ignition interlock law. Fifteen states—Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, and Washington—have mandatory ignition interlock provisions for all offenses. Illinois and Colorado’s laws are not mandatory for a first conviction, but there are strong incentives to install an interlock device [ignition interlock device, IID] on the first conviction.
Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, 2014

View laws, requirements, ignition interlock products and alcohol monitoring solutions available for you in: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Currently, 81 million Americans live in states that have all-offender ignition interlock laws, compared to 2 million Americans in 2006, and are therefore afforded additional protection against the alcohol-impaired driver. However, arrest data show ignition interlocks are still a vastly underutilized tool. This under utilization is evident by simply comparing the approximately 180,000 interlocks [ignition interlock devices, IID] in use in the United States in 2008 to the approximately 1.4 million impaired driving arrests made. This comparison shows there still is a long way to go to using ignition interlocks [ignition interlock devices, IID] to their full potential.
Source: Brian A. Ursino, Director of Law Enforcement, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, 2014

In New Mexico the number of alcohol-related crashes decreased from 128 in 2012 to 106 in 2013. The number of DWI arrests was also down, and one less person died in a drunken-driving crash in 2013 than the previous year. One factor is believed to be New Mexico’s ignition interlock law, which mandates one of the [ignition interlock, IID] devices for all DWI offenders. The state currently leads the nation in the number of ignition interlock devices (IID) installed per 10,000 residents.
Source: Santa Fe Prevention Alliance, 2014

67% reduction in drunk drivers with ignition interlocks

We know ignition interlocks have to be for all convicted drunk drivers. States that have ignition interlock devices, (IID) for all convicted offenders have been very successful and reduced DUI fatalities by 20% to 52%.
Source: Jan Withers, President of Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD), 2013

Approximately 22% of those arrested for drunk driving are installing ignition interlocks (IID).
Source: Annual Survey of Currently-Installed Ignition Interlocks in the US Richard Roth, PhD, 2013

There are approximately 305,000 ignition interlocks (BAIID) currently-installed in the U.S.
Source: Annual Survey of Currently-Installed Ignition Interlocks in the US, 2013

Specifically, all offender ignition interlock laws, when implemented well, are found to reduce repeat offenses significantly.
Source: McCartt, Anne, et al. “Washington State’s Alcohol Ignition Interlock Law: Effects on Recidivism Among First-Time DUI Offenders.” 2012

About 1/3 of impaired driving offenders are arrested for a subsequent offense. Ignition interlocks [car breathalyzer] can prevent these drivers from re-offending while the devices are installed.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2012

14% of intoxicated drivers in fatal crashes had suspended licenses

There is a 67% reduction of drunk driving repeat offenses when ignition interlocks [ignition interlock device, IID] are installed.
Source: Centers for Disease Control, 2011

Effective strategies to reduce alcohol-impaired driving are underutilized in the United States. Examples include sobriety checkpoints, enforcement of 0.08 BAC laws and minimum legal drinking age laws, multicomponent community-based programs, and ignition interlock programs for all convicted alcohol-impaired driving offenders.
Source: Centers for Disease Control, 2011

Public support for preventing alcohol-impaired driving is strong. Public support for ignition interlock programs is strong. These programs install ignition interlock devices (IID) in the vehicles of persons convicted of alcohol-impaired driving to prevent them from operating the vehicle if they have been drinking. In a recent survey, 90% of respondents supported requiring ignition interlocks for drivers with multiple alcohol-impaired driving convictions, and 69% supported this requirement for drivers upon their first conviction. Historically, ignition interlock programs have targeted persons with multiple alcohol-impaired driving convictions. As of August 2011, 14 states had passed legislation requiring or strongly encouraging use of ignition interlocks for persons upon their first alcohol-impaired driving conviction. Ignition interlocks reduce alcohol-impaired driving rearrest rates by a median 67% while installed and are estimated to result in a 6.6 benefit:cost ratio (8); however, only about 20% of eligible offenders currently are enrolled in ignition interlock programs.
Source: Centers for Disease Control, 2011

Work related crashes caused by alcohol

Alcohol-impaired driving killed more than 10,000 people in the United States [in 2009], making driving while intoxicated (DWI) one of our Nation’s most important highway safety issues. Increasingly, states are using ignition interlocks [ignition interlock devices, IID] as a key part of their overall strategy to reduce the incidence of DWI and to save lives.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2010

There is clear evidence that the ignition interlock device (IID), installed in the offender’s vehicle, is substantially more effective than license suspension in deterring DUI recidivism. The overall reduction in recidivism realized by ignition interlock device (IID) use is enhanced by increased duration of installation – a sanction effect not observed for license suspension.
Source: NIAAA Final Report, 2008

Over 90% of ignition interlock [car breathalyzer] users reported that the device has been successful to very successful in preventing them from drinking and driving; over 90% also reported that the ignition interlock has been effective or somewhat effective in changing their drinking habits.
Source: Drew Malloy, American Probation and Parole Association, 2007

States requiring all convicted drunk drivers to use an ignition interlock device (IID), such as Arizona, Oregon, New Mexico and Louisiana have cut DUI deaths by over 30%.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS Data, 2006-2011

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Youth

Almost half of all 10th graders drink alcohol.
Source: Johnston, L. D., O'Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E., 2013

In 2012, 239 child passengers (under age 15) were killed in drunk driving crashes – representing 20 percent of all child traffic fatalities. Of those, more than half (52 percent) were passengers in a vehicle with the drunk driver.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2013

1,249 minors (under 21) were killed in drunk driving fatalities in 2011.In 2012, a total of 1,168 children age 14 and younger were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes. Of those 1,168 fatalities, 239 (20%) occurred in alcohol-impaired driving crashes. Out of those 239 deaths, 124 (52%) were occupants of a vehicle with a driver who had a BAC level of .08 or higher, and another 38 children (16%) were pedestrians or pedalcyclists struck by drivers with BACs of .08 or higher.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2013

For young drivers (15 to 20 year olds) alcohol involvement in fatal crashes is higher among male drivers than their female peers – 28% among males compared to 16% among females.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration/FARS, “Young Drivers” 2013

1,249 minors (under 21) were killed in drunk driving fatalities in 2011.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, FARS data 2013

Drinking and driving [among youth] continues to be an issue of great importance. Drinking and driving rounds out the list of teens’ top three social concerns. More than one-third of teens (35%) cite drinking and driving as an issue they care strongly about, making it their top life-and-death issues and ranking it third overall following child abuse (40%) and education (40%).
Source: The TRU Study, 2012

Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death for 15 to 20-year olds. In 2011, 4,347 15 to 20 year old drivers were involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes, including 1,987 where 15 to 20 year old drivers were killed. More specifically, in 2011, 32%, or 640, young drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 who were killed in a crash had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 or higher, and 26% (or 523) had a BAC of 0.08 or higher.
Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration/FARS, 2011

The rate of drunk driving is highest among 21 to 25 year olds (23.4%).
Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2011

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Intoxalock company statistics

85% of Intoxalock customers would refer us to a friend.
Source: 2014 Intoxalock Customer Satisfaction Survey

Intoxalock helped over 90,000 people get back on the road in 2014 after a DUI offense.

Over 50% of our customers choose Intoxalock because we offer the most convenient service centers nationwide.
2014 Intoxalock Customer Satisfaction Survey

Intoxalock's ignition interlock devices have zero warm-up time in cold temps (down to 0°F) to get you on the road quickly

Intoxalock is state-certified in 40 states, and voluntary provider in all other states.

For less than $3 per day (on average) you can be back on the road with an Intoxalock device

Intoxalock has the Largest service center network with over 1,800 locations nationwide.

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